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23 February

T cells in babies give clues to who will develop type 1 diabetes

The research group of Prof. Ezio Bonifacio, group leader and Director at the DFG-Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD), Cluster of Excellence at TU Dresden, and group leader at DZD-Paul Langerhans Institute Dresden, introduces a new understanding of cellular mechanisms occurring in babies having a...
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The research group of Prof. Ezio Bonifacio, group leader and Director at the DFG-Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD), Cluster of Excellence at TU Dresden, and group leader at DZD-Paul Langerhans Institute Dresden, introduces a new understanding of cellular mechanisms occurring in babies having a high risk of developing type 1 diabetes. Physicians are observing an increase in the number of new cases of the disease each year among children and adolescents. In Germany, approximately 4 in every 1000 people suffer from type 1 diabetes.

Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body’s own immune system destroys the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. The process usually starts in childhood in genetically at risk children, and can be detected by the presence in the blood of antibodies to proteins in the pancreas. Each year, there are about 2300 new cases of type 1 diabetes in Germany and this number has doubled in the last twelve years. While a genetic predisposition helps to identify children at risk for the disease, researchers around the world still try to further identify why in some children at risk the disease breaks out while in others not.

Within the study introduced here, the Dresden researchers closely looked at six months old children at high risk of developing type 1 diabetes followed throughout childhood by Professor Anette-G. Ziegler (Helmholtz Zentrum München). One group of these children later in life developed autoantibodies that are typical for type 1 diabetes, while the other did not. When the researchers stimulated the T cells from the children with the pancreas proteins, they could identify a specific type of aggressive T-cells (TFH-TH1-TH17) that developed only in the children who later became positive for the antibodies. These T cells developed further into fully activated TH1 cells after the children became positive for the antibodies.

“Our finding on cells from these very young children is fascinating. It is the first time we are able to pinpoint a molecular difference in the immune system of children who develop diabetes so early in life. These exciting findings indicate that the immune system is already wrongly programmed, genetically or environmentally, really early. Our job now is to learn how to reset it before it starts to react against the insulin –producing cells. We hope that the Freder1k study and our prevention studies will teach us”, explains Prof. Ezio Bonifacio.

“We were able to find these rare cells in the blood with new sophisticated methods established at the CRTD. We are trying to understand exactly what these special cells do and how they come about“, says Dr. Anne Eugster, Scientist (Bonifacio group).

“We are excited at the possibility of using this knowledge to help developing prevention therapies such as our vaccination strategy”, comments Professor Anette-G. Ziegler.

About CRTD
Founded in 2006, the DFG Research Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD), Cluster of Excellence at the TU Dresden has now passed the second phase of the Excellence Initiative which aims to promote top-level research and improve the quality of German universities and research institutions. The goal of the CRTD is to explore the human body's regenerative potential and to develop completely new, regenerative therapies for hitherto incurable diseases. The key areas of research include haematology and immunology, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, and bone regeneration. At present, eight professors and ten group leaders are working at the CRTD – integrated into an interdisciplinary network of 87 members at seven different institutions within Dresden. In addition, 21 partners from industry are supporting the network. The synergies in the network allow for a fast translation of results from basic research to clinical applications.


14 February

Fraunhofer IWS Dresden collaborates with a strong research partner in Singapore

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and the Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology (SIMTech) have signed a memorandum of understanding for international collaboration in the fields of laser-based additive manufacturing and diamond-like hard coating technology. SIMTech is a research institute under Singapore’s...
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The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and the Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology (SIMTech) have signed a memorandum of understanding for international collaboration in the fields of laser-based additive manufacturing and diamond-like hard coating technology.

SIMTech is a research institute under Singapore’s Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR). The collaboration between Fraunhofer IWS and SIMTech started last year following Prof. Christoph Leyens, director and business unit manager Additive Manufacturing of the Fraunhofer IWS in Dresden, visit to SIMTech under its fellowship scheme. “With the signing of this memorandum of understanding, our collaboration will reach the next level of intensity” says Prof. Leyens, “For us, the collaboration with a world-leading institute in Singapore opens up new horizons in the important fields of additive manufacturing and coatings technology, both from a scientific and an application-oriented perspective.”

As a leading aerospace hub in the Asia-Pacific region, Singapore offers a huge market potential for these technologies. SIMTech also has strong links to industry through the A*STAR Aerospace Programme and partnerships with companies in the precision engi-neering, transportation, oil & gas, energy and electronics sectors. Fraunhofer IWS itself is a world leading-research institute in laser materials processing, surface and coatings technology; its mission is to support industry with innovative engineering solutions. “SIMTech’s collaboration with Fraunhofer IWS will enable us to accelerate the transfer from research to commercialisation, as well as to develop partnerships with industry players, in Singapore and around the world.”, says Dr. Jun Wei, programme manager at SIMTech.

Over the last few years Fraunhofer IWS has established a major research focus on additive manufacturing of metals, ceramics and polymers using various AM processes. The spectrum of applications ranges, among others, from aviation, space, medicine, energy, automotive, mechanical engineering and tool making. In collaboration with the TU Dresden, Fraunhofer IWS is running a unique innovation center for additive manufacturing.  

Diamond-like carbon coatings are already being widely used in industry. Hydrogen-free DLC-coatings show an even better performance. The coatings are fabricated using the unique laser-arc PVD technology developed at Fraunhofer IWS. “Our coatings are significantly harder and exhibit substantially improved frictional properties relative to state-of-the-art coating solutions”, says Prof. Andreas Leson, business unit manager PVD- and Nanotechnology at Fraunhofer IWS. “Since friction and wear occur virtually everywhere, the interest in our innovative coatings is enormous”. The success story of the coatings development was awarded with the prestigious Joseph von Fraunhofer Prize.


08 February

Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies,...
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The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial applications. For example, the fabrication of dental crowns or implants is just as much within the additive manufacturing application field as the printing of aircraft components is. This does not mean that the scientists may take a break, but rather exactly the opposite! “The huge potential promised by additive manufacturing can only be utilized, if science and industry cooperate. Presently we are using only a fraction of the potential which process- and materials technologies offer”, explains Prof. Christoph Leyens, head of the AMCD. The materials scientist is a professor at TU Dresden and a director of the Fraunhofer IWS.

A research team headed by Prof. Leyens coordinates the huge international research project “AGENT-3D“. This project brings together more than 100 industrial and scientific partners, who work hand in hand on solutions related to the implementation of additive manufacturing into industrial applications. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research has funded the project with 45 million euros. In addition, the involved industrial companies have supported the research project with about 30 million euros. Furthermore our IWS and TU scientists are working full steam on further research projects and industrial cooperations, since the international competition to find best product solutions is really strong. Prof. Eckhard Beyer, the executive director of the Fraunhofer IWS and a professor for Laser- and Surface Technology at TU Dresden, emphasizes the significance of the research with respect to additive manufacturing in Dresden: “Scientists join the AMCD to develop future manufacturing technologies. Our primary objective is the development of industrially mature solutions and thus to strengthen the innovative and economical capability of our partners.”

The AMCD ranks among the largest centers of its kind in Europe. It has been supported by means of the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft and the Free State of Saxony. The center offers the most important and industrially relevant manufacturing technologies for metals, ceramics and plastics. Its unique feature is the comprehensive expertise of all involved scientists with respect to process- and material know-how. Only the combination of process development and material expertise enables the production of innovative 3D-printing products, which are cost-effective and reliable as well. For example, a rocket nozzle (Fig. 1) developed for the space industry must resist the highest loads during operation. During the additive manufacturing of the nozzle even the smallest defects or cracks have to be avoided, since they would lead to the complete rejection of the part. Our AMCD laboratories offer comprehensive techniques for non-destructive or load tests in order to detect defects or to test materials. The AMCD unites the excellent basic research expertise of TU Dresden with the comprehensive IWS application-oriented research under one roof.

“The establishment of the Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden has an outstanding relevance for Saxony, explains Dr. Fritz Jaeckel, Minister of State, in his speech.  Cutting-edge research and the development of innovative technologies are the most important prerequisites for the positive development of our Free State, our society and our companies“. Prof. Gerhard Rödel, Vice Rector of the TU Dresden highlights the enormous significance of the cooperation between the university and Fraunhofer IWS: “With the foundation of the AMCD it becomes widely visible how our research alliance DRESDEN-concept works: namely, by scientific cooperation and networking of our greatest minds.” DRESDEN-concept is an alliance of TU Dresden and non-university research partners in Dresden. It was an important element for the successful application of TU Dresden as an Excellence University.

The inauguration of the AMCD took place on the eve of the 2nd International Symposium Additive Manufacturing, being held at the International Congress Center Dresden on February 8 - 9, 2017. Invited by the Fraunhofer IWS Dresden, more than 250 experts in the field of 3D printing meet to discuss the latest developments in this rapidly advancing research field. All participants will be actively involved in discussions by means of a “World Café” – a kind of speed dating for scientists. Here, they are invited to exchange their experiences in research and application in small groups with changing discussion partners.
 


07 February

LAUNCH OF BEAT-DKD: An Innovative Medicines Initiative Project (IMI) for Precision Medicine for Diabetic Kidney Disease with Lipotype as Project Partner

BEAt-DKD (“Biomarker Enterprise to Attack Diabetic Kidney Disease”), a unique public private partnership funded by the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI), member companies from the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations (EFPIA), the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF)...
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BEAt-DKD (“Biomarker Enterprise to Attack Diabetic Kidney Disease”), a unique public private partnership funded by the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI), member companies from the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations (EFPIA), the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) and the state of Switzerland has announced the launch of a 5-­­year project (total budget 28.9 Million Euro) with the aim to improve prevention and management of Diabetes Kidney Disease (DKD). Presently, there are no means to effectively prevent or cure DKD, which has reached epidemic dimensions and is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease. DKD patients are a very sick population with mortalities exceeding most cancers and who are underserved by inefficient and unsuccessful drug development. DKD remains a large unmet medical need.
 
Leading experts from 21 academic institutions, 6 EFPIA pharmaceutical companies, 1 biotech company and JDRF launched BEAt-DKD to provide a holistic systems medicine view of the pathogenesis and heterogeneity of DKD, with the goal to identify targetable mechanisms and pathways underlying initiation and progression of DKD, as well as to identify and validate biomarkers of disease progression and treatment responses, representing first steps towards precision medicine in DKD. 
 
“We are very excited to have gathered so many brilliant and truly dedicated investigators, impressive materials and innovative techniques in this unprecedented joint effort to make a real difference for patients with DKD!!” states an enthusiastic Maria F. Gomez, Project Coordinator, and professor at Lund University.
 
“This project represents one of the largest and most complete analyses of clinical data for identifying potential biomarkers for DKD and it will establish a new paradigm for precision medicine in the management of DKD.” says Dennis Andress, Project Leader from pharmaceutical company Abbvie.
 
About BEAt-DKD
Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is the most common form of chronic kidney disease (CKD), which at present affects more than 10% of the world population. Unfortunately, there are no effective means to prevent or cure DKD. Apart from Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System (RAAS) blockade, which has limited effect, very few alternative therapies have emerged. Lack of predictive and prognostic biomarkers for an accurate patient stratification, limited access to kidney tissue from patients at various stages of DKD and to appropriate model systems to better understand the pathogenesis of the disease, are likely reasons for the stagnating development of new treatments.
The BEAt-DKD team, coordinated by the University of Lund, Abbvie, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Helsinki and Sanofi, is committed to deliver better stratification of patients and more effective tools for use in innovative clinical trials, resulting in improved prevention and management of DKD, i.e. steps towards precision medicine. BEAt-DKD plans build upon: (a) access to large observational prospective cohorts with comprehensive genetic analyses and rich longitudinal clinical and biochemical data and samples from patients with DKD; (b) vast expertise in the development and use of novel genetic, epigenetic, biochemical and physiological experimental tools and approaches, including validated animal models of DKD for translational research; (c) extensive expertise in the development and validation of novel imaging approaches; (d) the ability to combine existing and novel datasets through effective data federation and use of systems biology approaches towards precision medicine; and (e) expertise in regulatory approval, health economics and patient engagement. BEAt-DKD will also capitalize from extensive and unique resources developed by previous IMI and FP7 projects. Results from this project are expected to translate into patient benefits and decreased societal costs associated with DKD.
 
BEAt-DKD participants are Lunds universitet, University of Helsinki, Academisch Ziekenhuis Groningen (University Medical Center Groningen), University of Oxford, University of Eastern Finland, University of Dundee, University of Exeter, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Turun Yliopisto (University of Turku), Universitätsklinikum Freiburg, University of Bristol, University of Leeds, University of Hull, CHU Hopitaux de Bordeaux, University Clinic Erlangen, Medizinische Universität Innsbruck, Klinikum der Universität Regensburg,  Medizinische Universität Wien, Università degli Studi di Bari Aldo Moro, Lipotype, University of Michigan, Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, JDRF International, AbbVie, Sanofi-Aventis, Astellas, Eli Lilly, Bayer Pharma, and Novo Nordisk.
 
About IMI
The Innovative Medicines Initiative is Europe’s largest public-private initiative aiming to improve health by speeding up the development of, and patient access to, innovative medicines, particularly in areas where there is an unmet medical or social need. It does this by facilitating collaboration between the key players involved in healthcare research, including universities, the pharmaceutical and other industries, small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), patient organisations, and medicines regulators. IMI is a partnership between the European Union (represented by the European Commission) and the European pharmaceutical industry (represented by EFPIA, the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations).


03 February

Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every...
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Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in order to program its magnetic properties. His colleagues from the National University in Singapore produced the grid using a photolithographic process similar to that currently used in chip manufacture. Approximately 250 nanometers sized holes, so-called antidots, were created at regular intervals – with interspaces of only 150 nanometers – in the cobalt layer. In order to be able to stably program it, the Singapore experts followed the Dresden design, which specified a metal layer thickness of approximately 50 nanometers.

At these dimensions the cobalt antidot grid displayed interesting properties: Dr. Bali’s team discovered that with the aid of an externally applied magnetic field three distinct magnetic states around each hole could be configured. The scientists called these states "G", "C" and "Q". Dr. Bali: "Antidots are now in the international research spotlight. By optimizing the antidot geometry we were able to show that the spins, or the magnetic moments of the electrons, could be reliably programmed around the holes."

Building blocks for future logic
Since the individually programmable holes are situated in a magnetic metal layer, the grid geometry has potential use in computers that would work with spin-waves instead of electric current. "Spin-waves are similar to the so-called Mexican waves you see in a football stadium. The wave propagates through the stadium, but the individual fans, in our case the electrons, stay seated", explains Dr. Bali. Logic chips utilizing such spin-waves would use far less power than today’s processors, because no electrical current is involved.

Many magnetic states can be realized in the perforated grid so that the spin-waves can, for example, be assigned specific directions. This could allow for a higher processing speed in future logic chips. "Our perforated grids could also operate as components for future circuits working with spin-waves“, estimates Dr. Bali. Doctoral candidate, Tobias Schneider, is now investigating the dynamics developed by the spin-waves in such perforated grids. Among other aspects he is participating in the development of special computer programs making possible the complex calculation of the magnetic states in perforated grids.


03 February

Dresden scientists making progress with energy-saving transistors from germanium

A team of scientists from the Nanoelectronic Materials Laboratory (NaMLab gGmbH) and the Cluster of Excellence Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden (cfaed) at the Dresden University of Technology have demonstrated the world-wide first transistor based on germanium that can be programmed between electron-...
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A team of scientists from the Nanoelectronic Materials Laboratory (NaMLab gGmbH) and the Cluster of Excellence Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden (cfaed) at the Dresden University of Technology have demonstrated the world-wide first transistor based on germanium that can be programmed between electron- (n) and hole- (p) conduction. Transistors based on germanium can be operated at low supply voltages and reduced power consumption, due to the low band gap compared to silicon. Additionally, the realized germanium based transistors can be reconfigured between electron and hole conduction based on the voltage applied to one of the gate electrodes. This enables to realize circuits with lower transistor count compared to state-of-the-art CMOS technologies.

Today´s digital electronics are dominated by integrated circuits built by transistors. For more than four decades transistors have been miniaturized to enhance computational power and speed. Recent developments aim to maintain this trend by employing materials having higher mobility than silicon in the transistor channel, like germanium and indium-arsenide.

One of the limitations in using those materials is the higher static power loss in the transistor´s off-state, also originating from their small band gaps. The scientist team around Jens Trommer and Dr. Walter Weber from NaMLab in cooperation with cfaed succeeded in solving this issue by conceiving the germanium-nanowire transistor with independent gating regions. Dr. Weber who leads cfaed’s Nanowire Research Group points out: “For the first time the results demonstrate the combination of low operation voltages with reduced off-state leakage. The results are a key enabler for novel energy efficient circuits.”

The work has been published in the journal ACS Nano.

The work has been supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG) in the project ReproNano and has been performed in close cooperation with the DFG Cluster of Excellence Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden (cfaed). NaMLab will strive for further implementation in future products as well as further advancement in R&D with its industrial partners.

About NaMLab
The Nanoelectronic Materials Laboratory gGmbH (NaMLab) was founded in July 2006. It is now a non-profit subsidiary company and an associated institute  of the TU Dresden.  The company runs research facilities with four labs, a clean room and office area for more than 40 scientists and employees on the campus of the TU Dresden. Material research and development combined with the implementation in nano-electronic devices are the goal of NaMLab´s activities. Scientists of NaMLab are closely cooperating with the institutes of the TU Dresden.

About cfaed
cfaed is a microelectronics research cluster of the German Excellence Initiative. It comprises 11 cooperating institutes in Saxony. About 300 scientists from more than 20 countries investigate completely new technologies for electronic information processing. These technologies are inspired by innovative materials such as silicon nanowires, carbon nanotubes or polymers or based on completely new concepts such as the chemical chip or circuit fabrication methods by self-assembling structures e.g., DNA-Origami. The orchestration of these new devices into heterogeneous information processing systems with focus on their resilience and energy-efficiency is also part of cfaed’s research program which comprises nine different research paths.


01 February

TU Dresden materials scientist awarded by the Chinese State Government

For his outstanding commitment to the German-Chinese scientific exchange in the field of lightweight construction, the Chinese Government has awarded TU Dresden's Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Werner Hufenbach the 2016 ›International Scientific and Technological Cooperation Award‹. The award is the most significant...
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For his outstanding commitment to the German-Chinese scientific exchange in the field of lightweight construction, the Chinese Government has awarded TU Dresden's Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Werner Hufenbach the 2016 ›International Scientific and Technological Cooperation Award‹. The award is the most significant Chinese accolade in this area. Prof. Hufenbach is the first and, to date, only international scientist in the field of engineering to receive this prize, which has been presented during an official act of state in the Great Hall of the People, led by the President of the People’s Republic of China, Xi Jinping. Apart from Prof. Hufenbach, Prof. Dr. Katharina Kohse-Höinghaus of the University of Bielefeld, and three scientists from France, Mexico and the USA received the 2016 award.

Since the early 1980s, Prof. Hufenbach has been committed to bilateral research co-operation between Germany and China – in the early stages as a member of TU Clausthal, later based at TU Dresden. ‘For us, it has always been about fruitful joint projects aiming at the implementation of cutting-edge scientific expertise into technical processes’, says Prof. Hufenbach.

In 1994, Professor Hufenbach founded the Institute of Lightweight Engineering and Polymer Technology at TU Dresden and turned it into one of the leading national and international research institutes in this field. Even today, he is still serving as Senior Professor on the institute’s executive board . With over 240 employees and about 11 million euros in third-party funding in 2016, the institute is one of TU Dresden’s key institutions of. From the very beginning, the success of the Institute of Lightweight Engineering and Polymer Technology has been closely tied to major projects, co-funded by the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG): ‘Two research groups, three Collaborative Research Centres and one Priority Programme provided me with a highly qualified and financially secure environment, enabling me to push my ideas forward, acquire basic research findings and generate innovative scientific methods’, Prof. Hufenbach on his time at the institute.

Already in 1995, the Dresden Model of ›function-integrative system lightweight engineering in multi-material design‹ was developed by Prof. Werner Hufenbach. This happened in the context of an innovative research network, linked to TU Dresden and many extra-mural research institutions.

From 2002 to 2013, Hufenbach researched and taught at the Chinese German College (Chinesisch-Deutsches Hochschulkolleg, CDHK) of Tongji University in Shanghai, a TU Dresden partner university. Since 2015, he and CRRC Qingdao Sifang – the world market leader in the railway sector – have been developing an open innovation platform for lightweight trains of the future. This co-operation resulted in the establishment of a Dresden-based Chinese-German joint venture.

Prof. Hans Müller-Steinhagen, Rector of TU Dresden states: ‘We are exceptionally delighted that the Chinese government acknowledged the accomplishments of our colleague Professor Werner Hufenbach with its most prestigious award in the field of scientific and technological collaboration – the ›International Scientific and Technological Cooperation Award‹. As a University of Excellence, we are proud that this honour was bestowed upon a scientist of our university who, for decades, has successfully devoted himself to the integration of cutting-edge research into technical processes – inter alia, in co-operation with Chinese institutions. With this award, the so-called Dresden model of ›function-integrative system lightweight engineering in multi-material design‹ gains even more international recognition.’

Prof. Hufenbach on the Chinese award: ‘This award is the pinnacle of my career as it connects science and technology. This connection was and still is a basic concern of my professional activity. This is also reflected in my Dresden Model of ›function-integrative system lightweight engineering in multi-material design‹. Today, this model is the national and international standard for modern lightweight construction. It contains the entire value-added chain, from materials development to design, simulation, process, quality and finally the product. The model is designed as a cross-materials and cross-industry approach and requires extensive cross-sectional knowledge.’

The Saxon State Minister of Science and the Arts, Dr. Eva-Maria Stange: ‘I warmly congratulate Prof. Hufenbach on this great state honour. Not only is he a founding member of lightweight construction at TU Dresden and in Saxony, but since then, he has also been setting international standards. His strong commitment in China brought international acclaim to the Free State of Saxony as a hub for lightweight construction. Experts from Chemnitz and Freiberg also benefit from this prominence. With his dedication in Saxony and China, Prof. Hufenbach proves that science is international and can only be successful if experts exchange their knowledge from different fields and closely co-operate with one another.’


Excellence is the city‘s motto

Dresden’s success is based on key technologies including microelectronics, information-and-communications, new materials, photovoltaic and nanotechnology, and, life sciences and biotechnology. The interdisciplinary collaboration between businesses and research facilities helps move Dresden forward.