News

Here you can find the lates news about the science and business location of Dresden

20 April

Glycosaminoglycan-based hydrogels for a better treatment of chronic wounds

Researchers from Dresden and Leipzig have jointly developed and tested a set of hydrogel wound dressings based on glycosaminoglycans. The hydrogels allow for the reduction of inflammatory reactions in ways that promise new treatment modalities for patients suffering from chronic cutaneous wounds. Diabetes,...
» Read More
Researchers from Dresden and Leipzig have jointly developed and tested a set of hydrogel wound dressings based on glycosaminoglycans. The hydrogels allow for the reduction of inflammatory reactions in ways that promise new treatment modalities for patients suffering from chronic cutaneous wounds.

Diabetes, a globally prevalent medical condition with more than 420 million affected patients, is often associated with chronic wounds whose treatment remains challenging. Researchers at the Leibniz Institute of Polymer Research Dresden and the Department of Dermatology of the University of Leipzig have now jointly developed and tested a set of hydrogel wound dressings based on glycosaminoglycans, a class of naturally occurring carbohydrates. The hydrogels allow for the reduction of inflammatory reactions in ways that promise new treatment modalities for patients suffering from chronic cutaneous wounds.

Collaborating within the Coordinated Research Center “Functional biomaterials for controlling healing processes in bone and skin” of the German Research Foundation, the interdisciplinary team explored a new approach to neutralize pro-inflammatory chemokines, signaling proteins that trigger the migration of immune cells into skin wounds. Employing biomolecular interactions, the engineered hydrogels were shown to effectively bind and inactivate pro-inflammatory chemokines.

As reported in the current issue of Science Translational Medicine and highlighted with the cover image, the novel wound dressings accelerated cutaneous healing in a diseased animal model. Further testing of the promising materials may pave the way for a potential future application in human patients. Beyond that, the underlying concept is expected to be similarly applicable in the treatment of other disorders associated with pathologically enhanced inflammatory reactions.


19 April

New laser processes for innovative lightweight design

Lightweight design is one of the mostly progressive research areas involved in accomplishing the transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources, as well as the reduction of CO2 emissions. Innovative materials, such as carbon or glass fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP/GFRP), as well as metal foams, contribute...
» Read More
Lightweight design is one of the mostly progressive research areas involved in accomplishing the transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources, as well as the reduction of CO2 emissions. Innovative materials, such as carbon or glass fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP/GFRP), as well as metal foams, contribute to the successful implementation of the target set by the Federal Government. The Fraunhofer IWS has been researching in this field for many years to provide promising and affordable solutions for our industrial and research partners. One of these solutions is the laser-remote cutting technique.

Metal foams are the ideal basic material for innovative lightweight design. Combining low weight and high stability, they have a high surface-to-volume ratio and absorb energy and sound almost ideally. They have already been used in various industrial applications, such as battery technology, heat exchangers and filter systems. Cost-efficient cutting of foamed material into parts with a defined shape has been the greatest technological challenge thus far.

The researchers at the Fraunhofer IWS have tackled this task with considerable success. They have achieved impressive results in terms of cutting velocity and quality in cutting open-porous metal foams to shape. »Enabling cutting velocities of up to 300 m/min in contour cutting and for material thicknesses of up to 20 mm, we are setting new stand-ards in metal foam processing« Robert Baumann, the head researcher, explains. »The
±30 µm component tolerances achieved thereby are the best available worldwide; with them, it is possible to create intricate geometries with wall thicknesses of a few hundred micrometers« Baumann continues. At the Fraunhofer IWS, the research team is able to apply the latest laser beam sources of different wavelengths, power and beam quality, as well as commercial optical devices for processing.

The IWS‘ lightweight design know-how was enhanced through comprehensive R&D projects with regard to the cutting of non-metals and CFRP and FRP materials. Laser-remote cutting of composite materials makes it possible to combine the highly efficient cutting process with extremely high cutting edge quality. The current focus is on the development of the automatable process to rework cutting edges of holes in fiber-reinforced plastics. A barrier layer is useful in carbon fiber reinforced plastics primarily to avoid corrosion in the joint with metals used in lightweight design and to prevent weathering due to environmental impacts. »The results achieved with a prototype-tool are of outstanding quality« says Michael Rose, expert in laser-based cutting to shape of fiber-reinforced plastics at the IWS. »We are convinced that these results will be widely implemented in industry in the near future.«


11 April

Prof. Claudia Felser receives her second ERC Advanced Grant

With this prestigious grant of the European Research Council, Claudia Felser and her team will study single crystals of topological materials and their physical properties. She will receive more than two million Euros over a period of five years. Using this grant, they plan to engineer this new class of...
» Read More
With this prestigious grant of the European Research Council, Claudia Felser and her team will study single crystals of topological materials and their physical properties. She will receive more than two million Euros over a period of five years.

Using this grant, they plan to engineer this new class of quantum materials via the synthesis of high quality single crystals and tune their topological phase transitions, transport properties and surface states by the application of electric and magnetic fields and high pressure. To further boost topological science in Europe, a single crystal platform will be established within the project.


Excellence is the city‘s motto

Dresden’s success is based on key technologies including microelectronics, information-and-communications, new materials, photovoltaic and nanotechnology, and, life sciences and biotechnology. The interdisciplinary collaboration between businesses and research facilities helps move Dresden forward.