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16 January

AvH PostDoc Fellow to research at TU Dresden

The Italian material scientist Dr. Marco Salvalaglio started one of the renowned Alexander von Humboldt PostDoc fellowships at the Institute of Scientific Computing (IWR) at TU Dresden in December 2016. In his 24-months project „Phase-field modeling and simulations of the evolution of crystalline heterostructures...
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The Italian material scientist Dr. Marco Salvalaglio started one of the renowned Alexander von Humboldt PostDoc fellowships at the Institute of Scientific Computing (IWR) at TU Dresden in December 2016. In his 24-months project „Phase-field modeling and simulations of the evolution of crystalline heterostructures for cutting-edge microelectronics applications,” he targets at researching new applications in microelectronics by using mathematics.

Mathematics is often referred to as a rather dusty and dry subject, which lacks any practical relevance. Far from it! Prof. Dr. Axel Voigt is Director of the Institute of Scientific Computing (IWR) at TU Dresden and since December 2016 the scientific host of the AvH postdoc fellow Dr. Marco Salvalaglio from Italy. The IWR pursues in an interdisciplinary approach the development of mathematical models, numerical algorithms and simulation software in order to answer relevant and cutting-edge issues from the natural and engineering sciences. Modern high-performance computers offer comprehensive research possibilities in fields of materials sciences, biology, mechanics, art and design.
Due to the innovative and interdisciplinary research environment, Dr. Salvalaglio decided to pursue his AvH postdoc fellowship at the IWR. After having been at TU Dresden as a visiting PhD in 2014 and 2015, he was determined to continue his research activity about the modeling and simulation of materials with Prof. Voigt as host.

His project „Phase-field modeling and simulations of the evolution of crystalline heterostructures for cutting-edge microelectronics applications” deals with the theoretical modelling and simulation of material properties at the nano- and microscale. He therefore aims at using the so-called phase-field modeling, a strong expertise of the IWR. The phase-field approach allows for the easy managing of complex geometries evolving in time and for the simultaneous modeling of different physical effects. In this way, Dr. Salvalaglio hopes to tackle the study of the growth and processing of advanced materials. The subsequent aim is to exploit this theoretical framework in order to investigate specific, technology-relevant heterostructures, tailoring prototypical systems for microelectronics applications. The comparisons of the theoretical results to experimental systems will be carried out in collaboration with the Material Research Department of the Leibniz Institute IHP in Frankfurt (Oder) led by Prof. Thomas Schroeder.
 


04 January

Large, but nevertheless micro – high resolution OLED microdisplay for virtual reality applications

Fraunhofer FEP will present a new generation of OLED microdisplays at the SID-Mid-Europe Chapter Spring Meeting, running from 13th to 14th of March 2017 in Dresden. The conference will focus on “Wearable and Projection Displays”. A number of top-level and interesting speakers will give talks on markets, technologies,...
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Fraunhofer FEP will present a new generation of OLED microdisplays at the SID-Mid-Europe Chapter Spring Meeting, running from 13th to 14th of March 2017 in Dresden. The conference will focus on “Wearable and Projection Displays”. A number of top-level and interesting speakers will give talks on markets, technologies, systems and applications in the fields of micro and small area display technologies.

With applications ranging from gaming to professional uses such for assembly, maintenance information supply, and pilot training in flight simulators, virtual reality glasses and their supporting systems are becoming more and more established, whilst at the same time also initiating and facilitating developments in new fields. A crucial aspect of virtual reality presentations is the display technology. Here, OLED microdisplays are receiving growing attention due to their technological advantages.

The LOMID project
The Fraunhofer FEP has long-term experience and a vast knowledge of the development and fabrication of customized OLED microdisplays for various applications. Within the EU-funded H2020 project LOMID (Large cost-effective OLED microdisplays and their applications) which is led by scientists at the Fraunhofer FEP, a new generation of large area OLED microdisplays has been developed which focusses on both virtual-reality (VR) and augmented-reality (AR, the latter will be tested within the project in visual prosthetics).

In the LOMID project, flexible OLED microdisplays of exceptionally large area (13 mm × 21 mm) with a screen diagonal of 24.9 mm (~1”) will be manufactured at challenging high yields (>60%). This will be achieved by developing a robust silicon-based chip design enabling both high resolution (1200×1920 (WUXGA) with pixel sizes of 11 µm × 11 µm for a pixel density of 2300 ppi) and highly reliable manufacturing of the backplane.

Mike Thieme, project manager at LOMID contributor X-FAB, says: “Economical processes (e.g. based on 0.18 and 0.35 µm lithography) are being developed at the CMOS silicon foundry and special attention will be given to the interface between the top metal electrode of the CMOS backplane and the subsequent OLED layers. In order to keep the CMOS manufacturing at low cost, numerous design rules have been pushed to their limits.”

Additional challenges such as conformability of the OLED microdisplays will be addressed to allow a bending radius of 50 mm. Along with these new functionalities, the durability of the devices when bent has to be guaranteed and be comparable to that of rigid devices. This will be addressed by improving the OLED robustness and by modifying the device encapsulation to simultaneously fulfill stringent barrier requirements (WVTR < 10-6 g/d m2) and to provide sufficient mechanical protection.
The high interest in large area microdisplays is demonstrated by the strong participation of industrial partners.

The partners
X-FAB Dresden GmbH & Co. KG will manufacture the CMOS backplane wafers, which will be used by MicroOLED S.A.S. for OLED microdisplay fabrication. These microdisplays will be applied by Limbak SL for virtual reality glasses. The research organization CEA-Leti develops processes to realize the bendability and an appropriate encapsulation, while Fraunhofer FEP focuses on the IC design of the CMOS wafer. The University of Leipzig works on inorganic transparent FET materials, and the University of Oxford develops prosthetics for people with impaired vision. The company Amanuensis is assisting the consortium with coordination, dissemination and exploitation activities.
The project will run until 31.12.2017 and will provide a high-performance OLED microdisplay with new functionalities addressing a wider range of applications.

SID-ME Chapter Spring Meeting 2017 "Wearable and Projection Displays"
First prototypes of the project OLED microdisplays and a presentation on the state-of-the-art of the technology and developments will be given by Dr. Beatrice Beyer (LOMID coordinator, Fraunhofer FEP) on the SID-ME Spring Meeting 2017 from 13th – 14th of March 2017 in Dresden/Germany.

Dr. Uwe Vogel, General Chair of SID-ME Spring Meeting 2017, Director of Fraunhofer FEP’s division “Microdisplays & Sensors”: “Within the frame of the chapter meetings of the Society for Information Display SID this conference „Wearable and Projection Displays“ focuses on technologies for micro and small-size displays, back- and frontplane technologies, embedded sensors, and addresses aspects like hardware/software design and system integration. We are pleased to have attracted renowned speakers from all over the world in advance (i.a. Siemens, Microsoft, Microoled, Kopin, and Universities of Cambridge, Strathclyde & Edinburgh), to give talks on markets, technologies and systems, addressing application fields from automotive, medicine, sports, security and smart devices, education and training.”


Excellence is the city‘s motto

Dresden’s success is based on key technologies including microelectronics, information-and-communications, new materials, photovoltaic and nanotechnology, and, life sciences and biotechnology. The interdisciplinary collaboration between businesses and research facilities helps move Dresden forward.